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All 15 of Miroslav Klose’s World Cup goals in one handy video, including plenty of headers and poacher’s goals. 

For comparison’s sake, here are Ronaldo’s 15 World Cup goals, spread over three tournaments (instead of Klose’s four). Soooo many golazos from outside the box, but also a penalty and what looked to be an own-goal by a Costa Rican defender? Regardless, both legends of the game. 

And Klose might even have a chance to own the record outright when Germany face the United States on Thursday. 

Beats by Dre have done a 5-minute long World Cup ad. And it’s terrific.

Unsurprisingly set to a brilliant backing track, it’s about footballers and their pre-game superstitions/rituals, predictably as most footballers trudge off the bus with Beats headphones around their neck. 

Featuring a host of the biggest stars of the football world (and cameos by others like Lebron and Weezy), watch it. 

Smashing new Umbro ad for their latest boot, the UX-1. Without the huge budgets and star power of their stripey/swooshy competitors, Umbro go down a different path, that of the football boot collector, one who cherishes the boot for its aesthetics and technology. 

As the Football Ramble put it, “If Nike are the Michael Bay of boot advertising, then Umbro are the Lars von Trier.” 

afootballreport:

Carlo Ancelotti: Cool in the hottest of moments

By Anthony Lopopolo

On the margins of a blank piece of paper, he would scribble in his starters. He would fill the rest of the page with points about the defence and attack: to maintain possession, to play two-touch football, to bide your time. And he would make copies and hand them out to his players before matches.

Carlo Ancelotti writes all of his notes by hand. He writes in ink. He always wanted to make that human connection. “You can’t write a love letter on a computer,” he writes in his book, The Beautiful Games of an Ordinary Genius. You could say Ancelotti is a bit of a romantic.

Communication is the most important thing. He wants everyone’s opinions. If one of his players is upset, Ancelotti hears them out. He prefers talking to his team instead of shouting; listening instead of ignoring, even when he knows he is right. 

“For me,” says the 54-year-old, coach of Real Madrid, “it’s managing people. Managing Ronaldo is the same for me as managing Carvajal or Morata.”

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